To find out the answer we’ve used information from car valuation companies that use all sorts of data to accurately predict how much new cars will be worth in the future when you come to sell it on. So we’ve compiled a list of the worst depreciating models from every manufacturer and ranked them based on the percentage of their initial purchase price that they are worth after they’re three years old and covered 24,000 miles as this matches the most common terms of a car finance deal in the UK.

Mitsubishi

The Outlander has been around for ages and it’s not exactly the most desirable car on sale, which could explain why it’s only worth 39.9% of its original asking price after three years. That means you’ll pay almost £30,000 for a new one but you’ll lose more than £17,000 when you come to sell it after three years. That’s more than 60% of the original price that it has lost.

Jeep

The Renegade is the smallest car that Jeep makes, it’s also the one that drops by the largest percentage of its purchase price. After three years, this funky looking SUV is only worth 39.7% of its original asking price. You can actually buy a new one for a little over £23,000 but get ready to lose almost £14,000 (or more than 60%) of the initial value when you sell it three years later.

Nissan

We thought the worst appreciating Nissan would be the 370Z sportscar, it’s been around for ages and it’s about to be replaced. But the 370Z loses out to the humble Micra. That car is only worth 39.3% of its original £14,500 asking price. That means you’ll lose almost nine grand (about 61%) of your cash when you come to sell it. A big drop for a small car.

Alfa Romeo

The Giulietta is really getting on now, it’s been around for 10 years and could be part of the reason why a three-year-old Giulietta will only be worth 39.1% of what it cost when it was new, which is £22,500 if you bought one today, so that means you’ll be losing more than £13,000 pounds when you come to sell it. That’s almost 61% of what you originally paid for it.

McClaren

Makers of really exclusive supercars such as the Speedtail, the 765LT and the Elva. The trouble is, this means that “normal” McLaren’s get forgotten about and this could explain why the humble 570GT is only worth 39% of its recommended retail price after three years. A new one costs more than £157,000 but you will lose more than £95,000 or 61% of the money you originally spent on it when you come to sell. I wonder whether McLaren’s reliability record has anything to do with it.

Volkswagen

The Passat is a very good car but it’s not exactly exciting, this could be why it’s only worth 38.5% of its initial £27,000 RRP after three years so when you come to sell it, you’ll be more than £16,000 out of pocket. That means you’ll have lost more than 64% of the cash you originally paid for the car.

Rolls Royce

Makers of some of the most expensive and exclusive cars in the world are still hit with depreciation, especially the Dawn convertible. After three years that car’s only worth 38.3% of its £280,000 pound plus asking price. So you’ll have lost a shocking £174,000 on it after three years. That’s almost 62% of what you originally paid for it.

Suzuki

The SX4 S-Cross isn’t the brand’s most exciting car and it doesn’t hold its value very well either. This SUV is only worth 38.1% of its £21,000 asking price after three years so that means you’ll be losing thirteen grand which is almost 62% of the cash is spent on it in the first place.

Ford

The Galaxy is the biggest car Ford makes and in this case big also applies to its level of depreciation. Buy a new Galaxy and it will be worth just 38% of its £34,000 asking price. This means you’ll be losing £21,000 (or 62%) in depreciation.

Jaguar

Jaguar sneaks ahead of Ford on this list but not in a good way. A three-year-old XS is only worth 37.8% of its original asking price. So, if you buy one for around £32,500, you will lose more than £20,000 when you come to sell it on. That’s more than 62% of what you originally paid for it.

Hyundai

The worst depreciating Hyundai you can buy is the I30 fastback. It might look better than your average hatchback but it’s only worth 37.6% of its original RRP after three years. This means you’re £25,500 Hyundai will have lost you almost £16,000 or, to put it another way, more than 62% of your investment

Renault

The Megane is a perfectly good family hatchback, but it does a worse job holding its value than any other Renault on sale. After three years, it’ll only be worth 37.4% of its original asking price. That means it’s gone from a £17,000 car to one worth six grand, so you’ll have lost £11,000 in depreciation or 63% of the initial sale price.

Subaru

The worst depreciating Subaru you can buy is the Levorg. This estate is only worth 36.4% of its initial value after three years so it goes from a £35,000 car to one that’s worth £22,000 pounds less. You’ll actually lose almost 64% of the money you originally spent on it.

Volvo

The S90 is also worth 36.4% of its original value after three years, just like the Subaru Levorg can, but the S90 is much more expensive. It starts at more than £55,000 meaning you’ll lose more money overall when you come to sell. More than £35,000 in fact, that’s nearly 64% of the car’s original price, which is why it goes ahead the Subaru in this list.

Smart

A three-year-old Fortwo Cabrio is only worth 36.2% of its original price. You can pick up one of these electric convertibles for under £25,000, but when you come to sell it three years later, it will be worth around fifteen grand less, that’s 64% of the original price gone.

Lexus

Sometimes cars depreciate because they tend to break down a lot but Lexus builds some of the most reliable cars in the world so it’s a bit of a surprise after three years, an LS saloon is only worth 35.7% of its original price. The LS starts at almost £80,000, so that means you’ll be losing more than £50,000 over three years. That’s more than 64% of what you paid for it when it was new.

BMW

It’s not just Lexus that makes big saloons that depreciate badly, it’s even worse for BMW. After three years, a brand new 7-series is only worth 35.6% of its asking price. That means this £70,000 saloon has dropped in value by more than £45,000, so you’ll actually have lost more than 64% of what you paid for it.

Vauxhall

The Astra is one of the best selling cars in the United Kingdom. But it’s actually one of the worst for depreciation. If you buy one today, it’ll only be worth 34.4% of the initial £19,000 starting price in three years time. That means you’ll be out of pocket by more than twelve grand when you come to sell it, or 66% of what you paid for it.

Bentley

Building some of the most desirable cars in the world doesn’t mean immunity from depreciation. The worst depreciating Bentley you can buy is the Mulsanne, also the most expensive Bentley on sale, but it’s only worth 34.1% of its £240,000 starting price after three years. That means you’re down by more than £157,000 and you’ll have lost almost 66% of what you originally paid for it.

Mercedes

When cars are going off sale or about to be replaced, they have a hard time retaining their value and that’s exactly what’s happening to the Mercedes SL. If you buy one of these roadsters now, it’ll be worth just 33.2% of its original price after three years. The starting price for an SL today is around £80,000 but you’ll lose more than £53,000 if you buy one at full price and sell it, losing 67% of the original value. 

Citroen

MPVs are being phased out by SUVs these days which is one of the reasons why there isn’t much demand for a second hand Ciroen C4 Spacetourer. Their seven-seater is only worth 32.6% of its retail price after three years. That means if you buy one for around £19,000, you will lose out on around £12,500 pounds when you come to sell it. This works out to 67% of the original asking price.

Peugeot

Next up is another French car, two of them in fact, the Peugeot 308 and the Peugeot 108. After three years both of these cars are only worth 32.2% of their original price. That means if you buy a 108 for around £13,000 today, you’ll lose more than £8500 pounds on it after three years. And if you go through a 308 which starts from around £22,000 pounds, you’ll be almost £14,500 pounds out of pocket. After three years for both cars, you’ll actually have lost almost 68% of what you originally paid for them.

Maserati

The Quattroporte is the most luxurious Maserati you can buy and you’ll need somewhere comfy to sit when you find out how quickly it depreciates after three years. One of these stylish saloons is only worth 32.1% of its initial asking price. So if you bought one for around £82,000 pounds, you will lose more than £55 grand on it. That means it depreciates by 68%.

Audi

While you might have expected a big Maserati saloon to depreciate pretty badly, what about an Audi? The new A8 depreciates even worse than the Quattroporte and a second-hand model that’s only three years old will be worth 31.1% of its original asking price, but if you buy one now, it’ll cost you more than £73,000 so you’ll lose more than fifty grand when you come to sell so that’s almost 69% of what you bought it for in the first place.

Fiat

Finally, we come to the worst depreciating car on sale today and it’s the Fiat Tito. One of these hatchbacks is only worth 29.7% of its original asking price after three years. You can buy one now for about £15,500 pounds but you’ll lose almost 11 grand on it when it comes to selling it. That’s more than 70% of what you paid for it in the first place!